Exponent Telegram: Service Pump uses technology to transform its business

HUNTINGTON — When you go online and order from Amazon, you get quick delivery of the product you want.

But Amazon does more than that. It uses your order history to offer other items you might like or need. Sometimes it even suggests products that might work better than the one you bought last time. You can even set up auto delivery of consumable items to be shipped to you just as you need them — before you run out.

Now, Service Pump & Supply is using the same technology to offer better, faster and lower-cost service to its customers.

 

“I don’t feel like we’re doing anything that’s exotic,” said Patrick Farrell, the company’s president. “We’re just doing things that are now commonplace in e-commerce, but haven’t been done before in the industries where we operate.”

Founded in 1980, Service Pump is a Huntington-based industrial products company that works in the world of oil and gas, mining, industrial and municipal water management. It operates five branches in four states, selling pumps, motors and other supplies.

If there’s a water project going on somewhere in the region, there’s a good chance Service Pump has a piece of it, said Farrell.

Today, Service Pump’s computerized system tracks customers’ orders and stores away information collected when it services or fixes that equipment. Then the company uses that data to offer customers insight into how to streamline their supply chain — and save money. Read the full story »

InformationWeek: Pumping up the SPS Customer Experience with Kenandy

SPS customer experiences have radically changed. SPS was serving one customer in particular recently that had hired SPS to conduct 100 pump repair calls to a variety of production sites. Because SPS now has all of the customer data in one accessible place (which can be viewed via a mobile device), SPS employees were able to provide the customer with details about why the repairs kept happening, which crews (of the customer) were on site when equipment kept breaking, the type of equipment that was causing the problem, etc. This level of insight and detail had not been experienced before by their customer and the customer was able to make changes to their business based on the data.

Published in InformationWeek

by Ben Kepes

The Amazon experience isn’t just for consumer-facing applications. Imagine what it can do for a traditional company.

It’s always nice to hear from an end-user of technology products that I’ve been writing about for years. While it is squarely in the job description of a vendor’s marketing executive to articulate just how perfect their solution is pumping up the customer experience with SPS and Kenandy every possible use case, actual customers tend to be more circumspect and to only wax poetic about the solutions that actually deliver benefits to them. And so, I’m always interested in hearing from these end users and exploring how their particular solution-set meets there needs.

And so it is with Service Pump & Supply, a West Virginia-based company that sells motors, pumps, and accessories to a sector that, let’s face it, is often viewed as an old-school industry — oil and gas, coal and mining companies. While this is one business that many would categorize as “boring,” that doesn’t mean in any way that it’s an unimportant one. Indeed, SPS got a call a few days after Hurricane Irma to ship a bunch of pumps down to Florida to help with cleanup, a critical part of the chain of relief.

Anyway, despite being a traditional business, SPS is well aware that the times are changing and had a desire to offer its customers a new type of experience, one which they might be used to with their consumer experiences, but not one they traditionally think of coming from their more conventional suppliers.

The CEO of SPS, Patrick Farrell, recognized this subtle demand for “Amazon-like” experiences and decided to jump on that demand to gain a competitive advantage. He could see the writing on the wall — his customers wanted simple processes, instant help, user-friendly technology, access to historical data for purchasing decisions, low prices, and instant or rapid delivery of products/equipment. The fact that customers were ordering pumps and motors didn’t deter them from wanting slick and sophisticated technology interfaces from their vendors. It’s not just the hip millennials who want experiences that are as easy as those with their favorite social network. Read the full story »